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For what reason Don't Birds Get Electrocuted When They Land on Electric Wires?
To be stunned you ought to be a bit of a whole circuit. This infers you should contact both a positive wire, and a negative or unprejudiced wire (or "ground"). If a winged creature was reaching the ground while reaching the wire, the ground would go about as an unbiased wire and the flow would course through the feathered animal, stunning it. If the flying animal sat on a wire and reached the metal of the curve or another wire, it would moreover add up to a circuit and get stunned. Since the juvenile's singular sits on one wire, it is shielded. The equal would be legitimate if a man were to bob onto and hold tight a wire without reaching whatever else. For whatever time span that the stream of intensity does not have far to get out, you end up joined into the wire and the power experiences you without expediting any damage.
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Because they're super creature with extraterrestrial almost preternatural capabilities?

Just kidding of course. Most electric wires you finf around on poles are mostly insulated and earthed. The insulation protects the electricity from being transmitted in a makes form because who knows what might happen right?

The pole may fall and all. And those poor birds with a knack for chilling on wires might end up dying a bit too soon. So taking all these into consideration, some wise people prefer to use insulated wires on poles.

Although I should also mention that NOT all wires on electric poles are insulated. For whatever reason some are always naked and if a bird should land upon one of these as electricity flows through it--then blame you have yourself a fried chicken.

Poor birds :(

Cheers XD.

sony1992, ... You, yourself, has explained the reason it very well.

It's correct, for current to flow, it needs two terminals. When a bird sits on a wire, it touches only one terminal not the other one (commonly known as ground in electronics language), so current keep flowing through the wire towards the second terminal rather than passing through the bird's body. But if bird touches its wing to other parallel wire then it will give the current another passage to flow towards the second terminal and it will pass through the bird's body ... Result ... Roasted bird.

Good day. 

Thank you Spammer, very informative.

You must have seen this scene while walking down the street or in the country.

Birds resting quietly on an electric wire. What ???? On an electric wire. But why are not they electrocuted?

Well just because electricity hates being stuck in a stalemate. Perched on ONE wire, the bird is in contact with the electric wire on the one hand and the air on the other hand. The air does not conduct electricity, the latter will not cross the body of the bird because it would be blocked. On the other hand, if the bird perched on its electric wire were to touch another wire (this sometimes happens to the large birds that spread their wings), there electricity could cross the body of the bird to pass from one wire to another . And squeak, a grilled bird.

To understand this I first propose a small experience, adapted from the site hand to hand. You will need:

  • 1 battery of 4,5V;
  • 1 electric bulb of 4,5V;
  • bare electrical wire;

- First of all you have to fix a stripped electrical wire on each terminal of the battery and extend them parallel to each other. This allows to represent 2 parallel electric wires. The battery represents the power station.

- Then you have to create a bird with the electric bulb. For this you have to make both feet of the bird with electric wire by connecting one of the feet to the base and the other to the socket.

- You just have to test by positioning your bird on your electrical wires connected to the central.

Finally if you want a little more precision, you can watch the video of Professor Nimbus on the subject.

It's normal for a character in the motion pictures to wind up with a darkened face and a headful of bunched up hair in the wake of contacting a live electrical wire. What makes for a decent stifler in the stimulation business, be that as it may, is probably going to murder you, all things considered—except if you're a fledgling. Flying creatures have no issue sitting, unruffled, on the high-voltage electrical cables you regularly observe coating the street. This capacity has nothing to do with them being feathered creatures, clarifies Ranbel Sun '10, MNG '13, an ongoing graduate in electrical designing who presently instructs at Phillips Academy in Andover, Massachusetts. It's about the associations they're making—or, all the more imperatively, not making. 

"Electrical flow is the development of electrons," clarifies Sun. The development of electrons through a gadget like your TV is the thing that gives it the vitality to show pictures and create sound. Sun depicts the long procedure these moving electrons take to get to your home. "The electrons are basically being pulled starting from the earliest stage the power station," she says. "They travel through the electrical cables, through your TV, and in the long run they advance once more into the ground from where they came." This makes a shut circle, which is required for power to stream. 

The other thing electrons require with the end goal to move is inspiration—or, all the more particularly, a distinction in what's called electrical potential. "Envision carrying a bundle of playing bunches up a mountain," Sun clarifies. "On the off chance that you give them a way, the balls will normally move down the mountain to a lower position." At the highest point of the mountain, the knocking down some pins balls (which speak to the electric flow) have a high potential, and they will go down any way that winds up accessible. At the point when a winged animal is roosted on a solitary wire, its two feet are at the equivalent electrical potential, so the electrons in the wires have no inspiration to go through the feathered creature's body. No moving electrons implies no electric flow. Our winged animal is protected, for the minute in any case. On the off chance that that flying creature extends a wing or a leg and contacts a second wire, particularly one with an alternate electrical potential, it will open a way for the electrons—directly through the fledgling's body.

It's commonplace for a character in the movies to wind up with a clouded face and a headful of pressed up hair subsequent to achieving a live electrical wire. What makes for an OK quiet in the impelling business, in any case, is apparently going to slaughter you, everything considered — beside on the off chance that you're a feathered creature. Feathered creatures have no issue sitting, unruffled, on the high-voltage electrical connections you a great part of the time watch covering the street. This farthest point has nothing to do with them being flying creatures, clears up Ranbel Sun, an advancing proceed onward from electrical organizing and programming planning who right presently instructs at Phillips Academy in Andover, Massachusetts. It's about the affiliations they're making — or, just more fundamentally, not making. 

"Electrical stream is the headway of electrons," lights up Sun. The headway of electrons through a gadget like your TV is the thing that gives it the essentialness to demonstrate pictures and pass on sound. Sun depicts the long system these moving electrons take to get to your home. "The electrons are on a very basic level being pulled starting from the most timely stage the power station," she says. "They travel through the electrical connections, through your TV, and as time goes on they advance again into the ground from where they came." This makes a nearby circle, which is required for ability to stream. 

The other thing electrons require with the genuine goal to move is inspiration — or, just more particularly, a refinement in what's called electrical potential. "Envision pulling a pack of pounding down a couple of pins groups up a mountain," Sun clears up. "In the event that you give them a way, the balls will ordinarily move down the mountain to a lower position." At the most amazing motivation behind the mountain, the shaking the shaking the knocking down some pins rear way byway balls (which address the electric stream) have a high potential, and they will go down any way that breezes up open. Right when a flying creature is roosted on a solitary wire, its two feet are at the relative electrical potential, so the electrons in the wires have no inspiration to encounter the flying creature's body. No moving electrons proposes no electric stream. Our feathered creature is guaranteed, for the minute at any rate… If that youth expands a wing or a leg and contacts a second wire, particularly one with an other electrical potential, it will open a course for the electrons — particularly through the flying creature's body. 

There are particular risks for our feathered accomplices, Sun calls attention to. "The wood shaft supporting the wires is covered some place down in the ground," she says, "so it would in like way be hazardous for a flying creature to sit on the post and contact a wire." This is the issue that individuals experience whether they contact live wires — since we are as often as possible in contact with the ground. Our bodies end up being marvelous channels of power, and the electrical stream will joyfully utilize them to finish a nearby strategy to spill out of high potential (the wire) to low potential (the ground). 

So how do specialists repair live electrical wires without getting hurt? They utilize anchoring materials in their vestments, gear, and pail trucks. Anchoring materials, for example, adaptable are materials through which control experiences veritable inconveniences spouting. So as opposed to encountering the circuit repairman, the electrons remain unexpectedly side of his adaptable gloves or flexible managed contraptions. (Remember: these aren't standard family gloves and contraptions — those are too thin to shield you from a trance and are once in a while not made totally of adaptable) Another philosophy is to hang underneath a helicopter. Since neither the laborer nor the helicopter is connected with the ground (like a winged animal), the ace basically needs to ensure he just connects with one wire at some arbitrary moment. Despite unending flourishing upgrades, being a power linesman is so far one of the ten most dangerous occupations in America. In this way, it's a sharp plan to avoid electrical wires except for on the off chance that you're a prepared skilled — or a flying creature.

I have often wandered the same thing.

Birds don't get shocked because the make up of their cell structure. They are not good conductors of electricity.

Their cells and tissues don't offer an easier route for the electricity so it carries on flowing through the cable.

Electricity flows from areas of high voltage to areas of low voltage. If the bird touched another wire then it would see that as another route and the bird would get fried with the huge voltage killing it instantly. This is the result of the bird now creating another path for the electricity to flow.

If we look at power lines they are spread out so it would be difficult for a bird to get shocked as you would need to touch two.

Image source welearneverywhere.com